Satellite & Stream in one box

Get the best of both worlds with the use of the Satellite & Streamed services in one.

CATCH-UP TV

LIVE PAUSE & RECORDING

BOX SETS

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ULTRA HD , HDR , DOLBY VISION

Ultra-HD-Premium-TV

What is Ultra HD Premium? New HDR standard explained
Read more at http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/ultra-hd-premium#kjRjtiOlS0cC7vft.99

ULTRA HD PREMIUM LOGO

How many logo thingies do TVs need? One more, apparently, but what is ‘Ultra HD Premium’ and should you even care? Let’s see if we can unpick this mess.

Is it a 4K TV or an Ultra HD TV? If you know your TVs, or have read our guide What is the 4K and Ultra HD?, you’ll know there isn’t much difference at all. While there are, technically speaking, subtle differences between the two, they’re the same thing to the man on the street.

Now the UHD Alliance, a consortium of TV manufacturers, broadcasters and film producers, have ganged together to create a new thing – Ultra HD Premium. It’s a logo program that defines what technical standards a TV must meet to deliver a ‘premium’ 4K experience.

Confusing as that seems the intention is sound enough. If a TV has this logo then – within reason – it’s a cut above TVs that don’t have it.

But nothing is quite that simple. If you want the long answer, read on.

WHY IS THIS LOGO STANDARD NEEDED?
It’s necessary because of ‘High Dynamic Range’, herein referred to as HDR. Our guide, HDR TV: What is it and should you care?, goes into more detail, but HDR is shorthand for several trends that allow for brighter, more detailed and higher contrast pictures from your TV.

But, as with any new tech jargon, it’s open to abuse and that’s what the Ultra HD Premium logo aims to prevent. By defining a set of standards for what TV manufacturers can all an ‘HDR TV’, everyone can be clear what they’re getting is the real thing or not.

In short: if a TV has the Ultra HD Premium logo then it will support HDR content. The logo will also appear on Blu-ray discs to certify the film or TV show has been produced to the standard.

WHAT’S SO GREAT ABOUT HDR TV ANYWAY?
Seeing is believing, but I’ve seen films shot and mastered for HDR and the difference is significant. HDR footage is richer and more ‘real’ than anything we’ve seen before. Dolby Vision, another standard for HDR TVs and cinemas, has already demonstrated how good it can be. For a little more on why, read the piece linked below.

Again, without delving too deep into the details, what ‘HDR’ does is release films and TVs from the constraints of decades old standards designed for time when technology was far less advanced. But making this work requires big companies to work together because if one doesn’t play by the rules then everyone suffers.

Dolby-Vision

WHAT MAKES AN ULTRA HD PREMIUM TV?
Here comes the science. There’s no easy way to simplify this bit, but here’s a rough summary of the technical bits.

Minimum resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 – This is the simple part as this is the resolution – the number of pixels that make up the TV’s screen – of 4K/Ultra HD TVs. There can be no confusion here.

10-bit colour depth – This means that the TV must be able to receive and process a 10-bit colour signal, which refers to the number of colours a video signal contains. Blu-rays use 8-bit colour, which equates to just over 16 million individual colours.

10-bit colour, often called ‘deep colour’, contains over a billion colours. This doesn’t mean the TV has to be able to display all those colours, only that it can process the signal. Most decent ones can, so there’s no problem here.

Minimum of 90% of P3 colours – ‘P3’ is what’s known as a ‘colour space’, a standard that defines the colour information in a video stream. Colour spaces exist to ensure that the picture you see at home looks right. Think of it as the language of colour in the same way English is a language with rules people agree on.

To qualify as an Ultra HD Premium TV, a TV must be able to display 90% of the colours defined by the P3 colour space. This number is what’s referred to as the colour gamut, or the number of colours a display can actually handle. So, a TV that can show ‘90% of P3 colours’ would be said to have a 90% colour gamut.

The higher the number, the richer and more accurate the colours on a TV.

rgb-color-space-gamut-1x

image: http://static.trustedreviews.com/94/0000370a3/d712_orh616w616/rgb-color-space-gamut-1x.png

DCI P3This is a comparison of different colour spaces. sRGB / Rec. 709 is the standard for current TVs and it covers only 80% of the colours available using the DCI P3 colour space. (Image Credit: Noteloop)

Minimum dynamic range – If your head is hurting now then things are only getting worse from here on in. Sorry. To qualify, TVs have to meet a minimum standard for the maximum brightness they can reach and the lowest brightness – known as black level – they can achieve.

Sounds simple right? Wrong. That’s because there are two different standards. They are:

OPTION 1: More than 1,000 nits peak brightness and less than 0.05nits black level

OPTION 2: More than 540 nits brightness and less than 0.0005 nits black level

The observant among you will notice that one demands higher peak brightness and accepts a higher (and therefore inferior) black level, while the other accepts a lower peak brightness but demands much lower (and therefore better) black level.

This is to accommodate the pros and cons of different TV technologies. LED TVs, which form the majority of TVs sold, support higher brightness but inferior black levels. OLED, meanwhile, can produce stunningly deep blacks, but aren’t as bright.

In other words, the alliance has found a way to make everyone happy. Hurrah!

If you’re interested, our guide to OLED vs LED LCD explains the differences between these rival technologies. And if you’re wondering about Plasma TVs, wonder no longer: they’re dead. No one makes them anymore.

COULD MY CURRENT TV BE ULTRA HD PREMIUM?
TVs could be certified Ultra HD Premium retroactively, but few TVs released in 2015 can meet the standard. So, if you’re interested in HDR, you’ll probably need a new TV. That said, any top-end TV from 2015 is still mighty fine, so there’s no need to feel sad about it.

WHAT ELSE WILL I NEED?
If you buy one of this year’s shiny new TVs with the Ultra HD Premium logo, you’ll need more kit to enjoy the benefits. First, you’ll need an Ultra HD Blu-ray player – no, your current Blu-ray player won’t cut it sadly. You’ll also need an Ultra HD Blu-ray disc mastered for HDR. Both the players and the discs, like the TVs, will start appearing throughout 2016.

 

HDR 10

 

https://www.avforums.com/article/what-is-hdr.11039

 

 

Netflix and Amazon have already started working on streaming HDR content, however, so Blu-rays won’t be the only source.

Read more at http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/ultra-hd-premium#kjRjtiOlS0cC7vft.99

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ULTRA HD PREMIUM 4K TV’S , HDR & DOLBY VISION

Ultra-HD-Premium-TV

What is Ultra HD Premium? New HDR standard explained
Read more at http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/ultra-hd-premium#kjRjtiOlS0cC7vft.99

ULTRA HD PREMIUM LOGO

How many logo thingies do TVs need? One more, apparently, but what is ‘Ultra HD Premium’ and should you even care? Let’s see if we can unpick this mess.

Is it a 4K TV or an Ultra HD TV? If you know your TVs, or have read our guide What is the 4K and Ultra HD?, you’ll know there isn’t much difference at all. While there are, technically speaking, subtle differences between the two, they’re the same thing to the man on the street.

Now the UHD Alliance, a consortium of TV manufacturers, broadcasters and film producers, have ganged together to create a new thing – Ultra HD Premium. It’s a logo program that defines what technical standards a TV must meet to deliver a ‘premium’ 4K experience.

Confusing as that seems the intention is sound enough. If a TV has this logo then – within reason – it’s a cut above TVs that don’t have it.

But nothing is quite that simple. If you want the long answer, read on.

WHY IS THIS LOGO STANDARD NEEDED?
It’s necessary because of ‘High Dynamic Range’, herein referred to as HDR. Our guide, HDR TV: What is it and should you care?, goes into more detail, but HDR is shorthand for several trends that allow for brighter, more detailed and higher contrast pictures from your TV.

But, as with any new tech jargon, it’s open to abuse and that’s what the Ultra HD Premium logo aims to prevent. By defining a set of standards for what TV manufacturers can all an ‘HDR TV’, everyone can be clear what they’re getting is the real thing or not.

In short: if a TV has the Ultra HD Premium logo then it will support HDR content. The logo will also appear on Blu-ray discs to certify the film or TV show has been produced to the standard.

WHAT’S SO GREAT ABOUT HDR TV ANYWAY?
Seeing is believing, but I’ve seen films shot and mastered for HDR and the difference is significant. HDR footage is richer and more ‘real’ than anything we’ve seen before. Dolby Vision, another standard for HDR TVs and cinemas, has already demonstrated how good it can be. For a little more on why, read the piece linked below.

Again, without delving too deep into the details, what ‘HDR’ does is release films and TVs from the constraints of decades old standards designed for time when technology was far less advanced. But making this work requires big companies to work together because if one doesn’t play by the rules then everyone suffers.

Dolby-Vision

WHAT MAKES AN ULTRA HD PREMIUM TV?
Here comes the science. There’s no easy way to simplify this bit, but here’s a rough summary of the technical bits.

Minimum resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 – This is the simple part as this is the resolution – the number of pixels that make up the TV’s screen – of 4K/Ultra HD TVs. There can be no confusion here.

10-bit colour depth – This means that the TV must be able to receive and process a 10-bit colour signal, which refers to the number of colours a video signal contains. Blu-rays use 8-bit colour, which equates to just over 16 million individual colours.

10-bit colour, often called ‘deep colour’, contains over a billion colours. This doesn’t mean the TV has to be able to display all those colours, only that it can process the signal. Most decent ones can, so there’s no problem here.

Minimum of 90% of P3 colours – ‘P3’ is what’s known as a ‘colour space’, a standard that defines the colour information in a video stream. Colour spaces exist to ensure that the picture you see at home looks right. Think of it as the language of colour in the same way English is a language with rules people agree on.

To qualify as an Ultra HD Premium TV, a TV must be able to display 90% of the colours defined by the P3 colour space. This number is what’s referred to as the colour gamut, or the number of colours a display can actually handle. So, a TV that can show ‘90% of P3 colours’ would be said to have a 90% colour gamut.

The higher the number, the richer and more accurate the colours on a TV.

rgb-color-space-gamut-1x

image: http://static.trustedreviews.com/94/0000370a3/d712_orh616w616/rgb-color-space-gamut-1x.png

DCI P3This is a comparison of different colour spaces. sRGB / Rec. 709 is the standard for current TVs and it covers only 80% of the colours available using the DCI P3 colour space. (Image Credit: Noteloop)

Minimum dynamic range – If your head is hurting now then things are only getting worse from here on in. Sorry. To qualify, TVs have to meet a minimum standard for the maximum brightness they can reach and the lowest brightness – known as black level – they can achieve.

Sounds simple right? Wrong. That’s because there are two different standards. They are:

OPTION 1: More than 1,000 nits peak brightness and less than 0.05nits black level

OPTION 2: More than 540 nits brightness and less than 0.0005 nits black level

The observant among you will notice that one demands higher peak brightness and accepts a higher (and therefore inferior) black level, while the other accepts a lower peak brightness but demands much lower (and therefore better) black level.

This is to accommodate the pros and cons of different TV technologies. LED TVs, which form the majority of TVs sold, support higher brightness but inferior black levels. OLED, meanwhile, can produce stunningly deep blacks, but aren’t as bright.

In other words, the alliance has found a way to make everyone happy. Hurrah!

If you’re interested, our guide to OLED vs LED LCD explains the differences between these rival technologies. And if you’re wondering about Plasma TVs, wonder no longer: they’re dead. No one makes them anymore.

COULD MY CURRENT TV BE ULTRA HD PREMIUM?
TVs could be certified Ultra HD Premium retroactively, but few TVs released in 2015 can meet the standard. So, if you’re interested in HDR, you’ll probably need a new TV. That said, any top-end TV from 2015 is still mighty fine, so there’s no need to feel sad about it.

WHAT ELSE WILL I NEED?
If you buy one of this year’s shiny new TVs with the Ultra HD Premium logo, you’ll need more kit to enjoy the benefits. First, you’ll need an Ultra HD Blu-ray player – no, your current Blu-ray player won’t cut it sadly. You’ll also need an Ultra HD Blu-ray disc mastered for HDR. Both the players and the discs, like the TVs, will start appearing throughout 2016.

Netflix and Amazon have already started working on streaming HDR content, however, so Blu-rays won’t be the only source.

Read more at http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/ultra-hd-premium#kjRjtiOlS0cC7vft.99

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WAAZON SEARCH THE NOW

WAAZON LOGO

 

 

 

Search The Now

 

https://www.facebook.com/waazon.tv/

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COWBOYS PAGE

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How do you align this

How do you align this

well its a bucket

does not get any better

does not get any better

not a great weld either

not a great weld either

stability would help

stability would help

its the internet pole

its the internet pole

at least its the right way up , the bucket that is

at least its the right way up , the bucket that is

can you see the problem

can you see the problem

again just awful

again just awful

Not tied back wind will be an issue. Remove the old bracket at least.

Not tied back wind will be an issue. Remove the old bracket at least.

Really should of replaced the cable properly for the price charged.

Really should of replaced the cable properly for the price charged.

Really should know how to connect to a Humax.

Really should know how to connect to a Humax.

Short cut anyone

Short cut anyone

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1.95 mtr Satellite Dish for Astra 2E & 2F

1.8MTR Prime Focus Dish (36)

 

1.8MTR Prime Focus Dish (39)

 

1.8MTR Prime Focus Dish (83)

 

1.95MTR Prime Focus with Engineers for scale

 

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UK Tv Listings

Check out whats on here

http://tv.sky.com/tv-guide

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3D Glasses

Liquid crystal shutter glasses

Liquid crystal shutter glasses (also called LC shutter glasses[1] or active shutter glasses.[2]) are glasses used in conjunction with a display screen to create the illusion of a three dimensional image, an example of stereoscopy. Each eye’s glass contains a liquid crystal layer which has the property of becoming dark when voltage is applied, being otherwise transparent. The glasses are controlled by an infraredradio frequencyDLP-Link or Bluetooth transmitter that sends a timing signal that allows the glasses to alternately darken over one eye, and then the other, in synchronization with the refresh rate of the screen. Meanwhile, the display alternately displays different perspectives for each eye, using a technique called Alternate-frame sequencing, which achieves the desired effect of each eye seeing only the image intended for it.

[edit]Advantages

LC shutter glasses mostly eliminate “ghosting” which is a problem with other 3D display technologies such as RealD 3D, or Dual projector setups. Moreover, unlike red/cyan colour filter 3D glasses, LC shutter glasses are colour neutral enabling 3D viewing in the full colour spectrum.

[edit]Disadvantages

Flicker can be noticeable except at very high refresh rates, as each eye is effectively receiving only half of the monitor’s actual refresh rate. Modern LC glasses however generally work in higher refresh rates and mostly eliminate this problem.

Until recently, the method only worked with CRT monitors; some modern flat-panel monitors now support high-enough refresh rates to work with some LC shutter systems [1].

LC shutter glasses are shutting out light half of the time; moreover, they are slightly dark even when letting light through, because they arepolarized. This gives an effect similar to watching TV with sunglasses on, which causes a darker picture perceived by the viewer. However, this effect can produce a higher perceived display contrast when paired with LCD displays because of the reduction in backlight bleed.

Frame rate has to be double that of an ordinary stream to get an equivalent result. All equipment in the chain has to be able to process frames at double rate; in essence this doubles the hardware requirements of the equipment. This is especially noticeable when the image stream is interactively generated in real time by 3D hardware on computers.

In addition, shutter glasses tend to be much more expensive than other forms of stereoscopic glasses. Whereas most anaglyph,ChromaDepth, and polarized 3D glasses can be purchased at very low prices (less than US$1 as of 2010, with anaglyph filters being the least expensive), shutter glasses feature far more advanced technology and usually sell for three orders of magnitude higher than paper anaglyphs and two orders over paper ChromaDepth and polarized glasses, with most models selling for well over US$100, particularly for the standard wireless models.

Shutter glasses are also matched to the TV so it’s not possible to take your shutter glasses to a friend’s house if he owns a different brand 3DTV. However, efforts are being made to create a Universal 3D Shutter Glass.

[edit]LC glasses providers

There are many sources of low-cost 3D glasses. IO glasses are the most common glasses in this category. XpanD 3D is a manufacturer of shutter glasses, with over 1000 cinemas currently using XpanD glasses.[3] With the release of this technology to the home-viewer market as of 2009, many other manufacturers are now developing their own LC shutter glasses, such as PanasonicSamsung, and Sony.

Nvidia makes a 3D Vision kit for the PC; it comes with 3D shutter glasses, a transmitter, and special graphics driver software. A certified 120 Hz monitor is required to use the 3D Vision; ordinary flat panel monitors run at 60 Hz.

[edit]History

Liquid crystal shutter glasses were first invented by Stephen McAllister of Evans and Sutherland Computer Corporation in the mid-1970s. The prototype had the LCDs mounted to a small cardboard box using duct tape. The glasses were never commercialized due to ghosting, but E&S was a very early adopter of third-party glasses such as the StereoGraphics CrystalEyes in the mid-1980s.

[edit]Compatible hardware

[edit]CRT display

[edit]DLP TV

In 2007, Texas Instruments introduced stereo 3-D capable DLP solutions to its OEMs, and Samsung and Mitsubishi introduced the first 3-D ready televisions. These solutions utilize the inherent speed advantage of the Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) to sequentially generate the left and right views required for stereoscopic imaging.

DLP 3-D technology uses the SmoothPicture algorithm, which compacts two L/R views into a single frame by using a checkerboard pattern, only requiring a standard 1080p60 resolution for stereoscopic transmission to the TV. The device re-generates two independent views for the left and right eyes and interpolates the missing pixels in each frame using the quincunx sampling algorithm. The claimed advantage of this solution is increased spatial resolution, unlike other methods which cut vertical or horizontal resolution in half.

A synchronization signal is then generated for LC shutter glasses worn by the viewer, using either a standard VESA Stereo plug to connect wired glasses or wireless emitters, or brief flashes of light on the viewing screen during the blanking interval (DLP Link). The LCD shutter glasses process the signal and control the shutter for each eye to ensure that the correct left and right views are presented to the correct eye.

[edit]3D PDP

Plasma display panels are inherently high-speed devices as well, since they use pulse-width modulation to maintain the brightness of individual pixels, making them compatible with sequential method involving shutter glasses. Modern panels feature pixel driving frequency of up to 600 Hz and allow 10 bit to 12 bit color precision with 1024 to 4096 gradations of brightness for each subpixel.

Samsung Electronics launched 3D ready PDP TVs in 2008, a “PAVV Cannes 450” in Korea and PNAx450 in the UK and the US. The sets utilize the same checkerboard pattern compression scheme as their DLP TVs, though only at the native resolution of 1360×768 pixels and not at HDTV standard 720p, making them only usable with a PC.

Matsushita Electric( Panasonic) prototyped the “3D Full-HD Plasma Theater System” on CES 2008. The system is a combination of a 103-inch PDP TV, a Blu-ray Disc player and shutter glasses. The new system transmits 1080i60 interlaced images for both right and left eyes, and the video is stored on 50-Gbyte Blu-ray using the MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 compression Multiview Video Coding extension.

[edit]LCD/LED TV

Liquid crystal displays have traditionally been slow to change from one polarization state to another. Users of early 1990s laptops are familiar with the smearing and blurring that occurs when something moves too fast for the LCD to keep up. This smearing can result in a completely unviewable image when using shutter glasses.

LCD technology is not usually rated by frames per second but rather the time it takes to transition from darkness to brightness and back to darkness, in milliseconds. In order to achieve an equivalent minimum refresh rate of 120 Hz, an LCD must be able to transition at a speed of not more than 8.33 ms. However, each frame is displayed for at most 8.33ms, and minimizing the response is key. For example: if it takes 8.33ms for the LCD to transition to the desired image, and a sequential black/white image is shown, the 8.33ms which should be displaying “white” will begin at black, and after 8.33ms finally achieve white. Similarly, the next 8.33ms which should be displaying “black” will begin as white, and after 8.33ms finally achieve black.

However, because pixel transition speed has become a strong selling point of LCD monitors, marketing hype has unfortunately obscured these speed-of-transition specifications with what some consider tortuous qualifying statements that make inadequate technology appear to be better than it really is (see PMPO for another example of such marketing distortions). While the average person attempting to buy a high quality LCD for normal home use might not notice these minor performance differences, a slowly transitioning LCD can have a severely negative impact on usability with shutter glasses. For stereoscopic applications, it is important that the LCD be truly capable of what is being claimed.

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RESETTING SKY HD

RESETTING SKY HD DIGI BOX

28.2 SATELLITE AERIALS & HOME CINEMA

TEL: 620198162

  1. PRESS SERVICES ON SKY REMOTE
  1. PRESS 0
  1. PRESS 0 then 1 then  SELECT on your remote            (SETUP SHOULD BE HIGHLIGHTED )
  1. PRESS SIDE ARROW TO TX SPONDER     (IT SHOULD NOW SAY default transponder)
  1. CHANGE FREQUENCY TO    12.207 
  1. THEN ARROW TO SAVE NEW SETTINGS & PRESS GREEN.
  1. YOU CAN NOW WAIT ABOUT 30 SECONDS TO A MINUTE & THE TIME SHOULD COME UP IN THE TOP RIGHT CORNER WHEN IT DOES JUST PRESS SKY BUTTON & CHECK SKY NEWS.

.

HOPEFULLY THIS SHOULD OF RESTORED YOUR VIEWING IF NOT PLEASE CALL ME BUT BEFORE DOING SO GIVE IT ONE LAST TRY BUT TURN THE POWER OFF TO THE DIGI BOX FIRST.

               HAPPY VIEWING HOPE THIS HELPED.

www.mytvcinema.com

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Resetting Sky Box

RESETTING SKY DIGI BOX ( default )

28.2 SATELLITE AERIALS & HOME CINEMA

TEL: 620198162

  1. PRESS SERVICES ON SKY REMOTE
  2. PRESS 4
  3. PRESS 0 then 1 then  SELECT on your remote            (THIS SHOULD BE INSTALLER MENU)
  4. PRESS 2 (default transponder)
  5. CHANGE FREQUENCY TO 12.207
  6. THEN ARROW TO SAVE NEW SETTINGS & PRESS SELECT.
  7. THEN PRESS 6 NEW INSTALLATION & KEEP PRESSING SELECT UNTIL IT SAY’S ASTRA CHANNEL SCAN PLEASE WAIT.
  8. IT MAY SAY NO DEFAULT TRANSPONDER IF IT DOES PRESS SELECT & JUST INPUT FREQUENCY AGAIN.
  9. THEN ARROW TO SAVE NEW SETTINGS & PRESS SELECT A COUPLE OF TIMES UNTIL IT SAYS SCANNING PLEASE WAIT.

10 .IF IT HAS NOT DONE NUMBER 8 JUST WAIT UNTIL IT SAY’S CHANNEL LINE UP COMPLETE & PRESS SELECT A COUPLE OF TIMES.

11 .PRESS YOUR SKY BUTTON & SELECT TV GUIDE AS NORMAL.

HOPEFULLY THIS SHOULD OF RESTORED YOUR VIEWING IF NOT PLEASE CALL ME BUT BEFORE DOING SO GIVE IT ONE LAST TRY BUT TURN THE POWER OFF TO THE DIGI BOX FIRST.

HAPPY VIEWING HOPE THIS HELPED.

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